THE TOP 100 COMIC BOOK HEROES OF ALL TIME

97. KARNAK THE SHATTERER

Since I’m the one who is putting so much time and effort into this ridiculous time waster (I probably could have learned to play piano in the time this has taken), I get to jam some oddball choices in.  Particularly in the back 9.  This is one of my indulgences.

I knew of the Inhuman named Karnak before I knew of the Johnny Carson psychic of the same name.  His powers were immediately fascinating.  As a fan of Shang Chi, Karate Kid from the Legion of Super Heroes, and, of course, Iron Fist, the thought of a dude who could break any object by intuitively finding its weakness was way cool.  His friendship with Gorgon and Lockjaw were just more endearing factors.

Karnak is much, much cooler than Carson.

Suggested reading:

  • Fantastic Four #45 (first appearance, reprinted in many forms)
  • Marvel Masterworks: Inhumans Vol. 2

96. PIRATE

Okay, Pirate isn’t really my pick here. It’s all three of the animals that made up Grant Morrison’s pet version of the Weapon X program in his Frank Quietly collaboration WE3.  The book may have been an animal comic, but it was far from a kid’s book.  Part Watership Down, part PETA pamphlet, the story followed three animals (a bunny, a dog and a cat) augmented as weapons who have the ability to communicate with each other and take it on the lam.

By the way, Pirate was the rabbit.

Recommended reading:

  • WE3

95. V (FOR VENDETTA)

Lots of folks probably don’t realize that Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s dystopian tribute to anarchy began as a black-and-white indie book published in 1982, but it made such an impact that D.C. courted Moore for six years to authorize them to publish (and complete) the series as part of their artist-owned Vertigo line.   The book widely recognized as one of the most important comic books of all time.

Recommended reading:

  • V for Vendetta

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